27th Annual Meeting of Minds Conference

The Meeting of Minds conference provides a yearly opportunity for undergraduate students from Oakland University, University of Michigan-Dearborn, and University of Michigan-Flint to share research accomplishments through oral and poster presentations. On May 10th, U of M-Flint hosted this year’s event, and lab members Velinka, Brooklin, and Taylor attended and shared their projects. These studies have also been published in Meeting of Minds online Journal.

Velinka and Brooklin presented their project titled How do Immigrant Parent-Child Adaptation Differences Affect Psychological Distress and Personal Growth in Immigrant Youth? They examined the psychological effects of youth-perceived parent-child adaptation differences and potential posttraumatic growth (PTG). They predicted that smaller-perceived adaptation differences will yield lower levels of psychological distress. The findings suggest that the degree of parent-child adaptation differences may affect distress and growth in youth.

Brooklin presented her and Nico’s project titled Medical Mishaps: Does a Physicians Specialty Determine Severity? They examined the relationship between physician’s specialties and the severity of medical mishaps that have been reported. They predicted that physicians who specialize in surgical units would be more likely to report involvement with serious medical mishaps and physicians who specialize in non-surgical units would be more likely to report involvement with minor medical mishaps. They found that both hypotheses were supported when looking at serious and minor medical mishaps among each group. They believe understanding the psychological changes physicians may go through when mishaps are committed can aid in clarifying the impact of medical mishaps, as well as, creating teaching aids.

Brooklin also presented her and Nico’s research project titled Varying Effects of Experience has on the Kinds of Medical Mishaps Occurring During a Physician’s Practice. They examined how years in-practice can influence the severity of medical mishaps a physician made within the past five years. They predicted that physicians who have been practicing in their specialty for less than 10 years would be involved in medical mishaps considered “missed information” while those practicing for 11 years or more would make medical mishaps considered “potentially harmful.” Even though the research did not yield significant results, it helps in understanding the importance of medical mishaps, and how they are committed. It also furthers the discussion of creating training programs that teach physicians how to avoid medical mishaps, and what to do if they do happen.

Taylor presented her and Nico’s research project titled Thoughts of Dropping out of High School and Posttraumatic Growth: Examining the Influence of a Negative Neighborhood Environment. They examined the influence of negative neighborhood characteristics on an adolescent’s thoughts of dropping out of high school and the likelihood they will experience PTG. They predicted that students with negative neighborhood characteristics would be more likely to have thoughts of dropping out of high school and due to stress, would be more likely to report higher levels of PTG. Although the research did not produce significant results, it helps to understand the sociocultural elements that may influence academic achievement and growth.

Josealyn Pontius, an incoming research assistant for the fall semester, came to show her support for the lab members that presented, and learn of other undergraduate research.

Overall, the conference was a success and another great opportunity to share the hard work of many!

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